Category: usgs

A male Lasioglossum truncatum, with great, lon…

A male Lasioglossum truncatum, with great, long antennae, the yellow tarsal segments are distinctive in conjunction with the yellow on the clypeus and the slightly weakened veins in the wings.  Collected by Tim McMahon and photoed by Dejen Mengis.  Here I see the hands of a Balinese dancer

An unknown Crab Spider or perhaps running crab…

An unknown Crab Spider or perhaps running crab spider

The Giant Stag beetle ….Lucanus elephus…

The Giant Stag beetle ….Lucanus elephus….a huge beetle of eastern forests.  This specimen can from California, Maryland and was collected by members of Bartlett Tree Company.

The red maple, Acer rubrum

The red maple, Acer rubrum

Often one of the most dominant trees in deciduous woods in the East. It blooms very early in the spring and provides pollen and nectar to the set of bees, and flower flies, that come out early. One can only imagine what the tonnage of pollen and nectar these trees produce in aggregate, and how such a seemingly small, component of the tree, flowers, could drive the populations of a huge number of bees and other insects in. Flowers collected by the photographs taken by Helen Lowe Metzman from Howard County Maryland.

The giant bumblebee (Bombus dahlbomii). 

The giant bumblebee (Bombus dahlbomii). 

A denizen of the southern Andes and widely believed to be in decline due to competition and perhaps spread of pathogens with two introduced European bumblebees that have invaded the region. You notice this bee when it flies by. Dramatically orange with yellow highlights on the traditional deep black integument of bumblebees.

Lithurgopsis gibbosa – In North America the …

Lithurgopsis gibbosa – In North America the members of this genus are primarily cactus pollen specialists. Since this one was captured in the sandhills of North Carolina by Heather Moylett it is undoubtedly covered in Prickly Pear cactus pollen. Note the projecting shelf just below the antennae on this female.

The luscious greenescent caterpillar of the br…

The luscious greenescent caterpillar of the brown drab northern pearly eye butterfly.  check out the 6 little eyes located down near the mouth/mandibles, I feel rather “Hello Kitty” when looking this one in the face

Baeoalitriozus diospyri, Persimmon psyllid

Baeoalitriozus diospyri, Persimmon psyllid

Taken at 10x with a microscope objective attached to an old 200ml lens.  This is a small small small plant sucking bug.   Likely it feeds only on plants in the persimmon group.  You can see the tip of a pin glued to its back.  Equally evolved as any other insect..this small thing has secrets to tell us if we were to watch and study what it does in order to stay around for so many centuries.

Collected by Brad Seay in Davidsonville, MD

Andrena cressonii.

Andrena cressonii.

Common, nearly ubiquitous.  Tolerates urban areas.  Just like us.

A new Washington DC record. 

A new Washington DC record. 

Triepeolus cressonii, captured in the Kenilworth aquatic Gardens along the Anacostia River.  

A very urban landscape, but one that still retains quite a bit of original nature thanks to the work of the National Park Service maintains the property as well as adjacent areas along this quiet backwater. The specimen was collected by and photographed by Chelcey Nordstrom.

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