Category: usgs

Kruger National Park presents a native South A…

Kruger National Park presents a native South African:  Xylocopa lugubris.  

This carpenter bee was caught cruising around the park while along on Jonathan Mawdsley and James Harrison’s expedition.  Lots of fun avoiding poisonous snakes, lions, and leopards and other big things.  Photo by Erick Hernandez.

Ah, the dancing curves of Corydalis flavula.  

Ah, the dancing curves of Corydalis flavula.  

A small part of the glory of spring in the Mid-Atlantic states.  

Picture and specimen from Helen Lowe Metzman from Howard County, Maryland.

Collected in Chile in Patagonia near Chile Chi…

Collected in Chile in Patagonia near Chile Chico,on an expedition with Laurence Packer.  

This is a Diadasia of some sort.  Laurence, surely will figure out all the species names so we can update these pictures.  

A yellow faced Calliopsis trifasciata from sou…

A yellow faced Calliopsis trifasciata from southern Chile.  Garnered on an expedition with Laurence Packer this past year.  

Wayyyyyy up in the Andes spitting distance fro…

Wayyyyyy up in the Andes spitting distance from Argentina, this wee Callonychium chilense was collected on an expedition with Laurence Packer to southern Chile.  One of those one way dirt roads that hugs the mountains and gives one opportunity to fall into the valley in a truly spectacular way. Memorable.

The next in the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN…

The next in the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN.  

Calliopsis are often specialists…the most common (C. andreniformis) loves things like hard packed playgrounds.  You have it at your house almost for sure.  Want more of them dig a whole or pile up dirt and they will move in for you to watch…along with their wee Holcopasites parasite. 

More from last year’s expedition to Chil…

More from last year’s expedition to Chile with Laurence Packer.   

Such a lovely country…we camped in a new place every day.  Ping ponging from the Andes to the Coast sleeping along the road or in open pastures.  Lovely people, easy travel, no problems with law enforcement people.   This is a Caenohalictus species of some kind.  Photo by Anders Croft  …Note the hairy eyeballs…similar to Honey bees.

Know Your Wild Bees Campaign presents &helli…

Know Your Wild Bees Campaign presents …how to spot a male Andrena

Agapostemon Male Field Id … Baby

Agapostemon Male Field Id … Baby

Start of a new series in the KNOW YOUR WILD …

Start of a new series in the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN. 

Now we move into the magic of field ID. 

Go outside, use butterfly binoculars … you can do it. Eastern North American Genera are our target, but in most cases the same characters will work anywhere. I am serious about this…the only reason we have bird conservation is because of bird watchers…so you need to become a bee watcher…and you will save the world.