Category: tongue

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Mystery Osmia, from the tip of Minnesota, Cook County, collected as part of project that Joan Milam is working on.   I, however, cannot figure out what species this is (some of the northern Osmia are not well known and in a state of muddle), so am putting out this picture to see who can help me out.  Thoughts welcome.  Photo by the fab Cole Cheng, who now is on school virus lock down so cannot come in to the lab any longer…sigh.    

This is Megachile coquilletti

a small bee from Yolo County in California. “This bee was collected in the California Central Valley in Yolo County for research on small-scale restoration in agricultural areas. Claire Kremen’s 10-year study of hedgerows shows the benefits of planting native shrubs and forbs in agricultural areas for native bees. To learn more about the Kremen Lab and hedgerows, see <a href="https://nature.berkeley.edu/kremenlab/&quot” rel=“noreferrer nofollow”>nature.berkeley.edu/kremenlab/&quot</a>;

Carrying on from the recent posts of Lithurgus chrysurus, here is another European bee that specializes on Knapweed.  

This specimen from the West Coast, but it occurs throughout North America.  Photo by Anders Croft.    This bee was collected in the California Central Valley him in Yolo County for research on small-scale restoration in agricultural areas. Claire Kremen’s 10-year study of hedgerows shows the benefits of planting native shrubs and forbs in agricultural areas for native bees. To learn more about the Kremen Lab and hedgerows, see <a href=“https://nature.berkeley.edu/kremenlab/” rel=“noreferrer nofollow”>nature.berkeley.edu/kremenlab/</a>

Pterocheilus quinquefasciatus. – Hunter of caterpillars…in this case, hunter of caterpillars in South Dakota Badlands. 

This wasp has long stiff hairs on the palps of its tongue and it uses them like a basket…carrying dirt of its nest and away from the nest entrance so it is harder for parasitoids to track its babies locations.

Here is a series of males and females of Anthophora urbana from Yolo County, California.  

This bee was collected in the California Central Valley in Yolo County for research on small-scale restoration in agricultural areas. Claire Kremen’s 10-year study of hedgerows shows the benefits of planting native shrubs and forbs in agricultural areas for native bees. To learn more about the Kremen Lab and hedgerows, see <a href=“https://nature.berkeley.edu/kremenlab/&quot” rel=“noreferrer nofollow”>nature.berkeley.edu/kremenlab/&quot</a>;  Photos by Brooke Goggins  

Melitoma species. 

One of several species that are in the Melitoma clan, that also occurred in Costa Rica. 

This bee being was collected by Tim McMahon while on an expedition to that lovely country. The species is currently unknown, at least to us, but note the very long tongue, super characteristic. It appears that most of the Melitomians are specialists on morning glories (Ipomoea) and you can understand why having a long tongue would be particularly useful.  Photography by Erick Hernandez.    

Andrena macra.  

One of almost 100 species of Andrena that occur in the State of Maryland.  

Quick glance, another dark bee, but if you look close you will see the dense pitting on the top of the abdomen, the subtle white hair bands on the abdomen, and most importantly the clincher is the inner tibial spur is s-curved in sigmoidality, while other species have more or less straight ones…sadly this is not visible in this picture, but take a look at the lovely tongue architecture instead and ponder why your tongue does not look like that.  Or … is it a tongue?  Photo by Brooke Goggins.