Category: south america

Back to the great Chilean expedition of 2017. …

Back to the great Chilean expedition of 2017.  

Here is Ruizanthedella mutabilis, which, if I recall correctly,  is something of a dirtball species, one that was found regularly and elicited no excitement from Laurence Packer, expedition chief. Halictids are like that.  Photo by Anders Croft

A lovely blue green teal spider wasp with purp…

A lovely blue green teal spider wasp with purple highlights and infuscated wings.  Collected in Southern Chile with Laurence Packer.  

Epiclopis gayi – a cleptoparasitic bee (a.k.a …

Epiclopis gayi – a cleptoparasitic bee (a.k.a nest parasite or cuckoo bee) of almost certainly Centris bees.  

Perhaps even of the Centris bee that was posted just prior to this as this bee was also collected in southern Chile on the expedition with Laurence Packer.  Photos by Kelly Graniger and Anders Croft.

Cadeguala occidentalis

Cadeguala occidentalis

A relatively common bee of Southern Chile.  Seen regularly on Laurence Packer’s expedition there in 2017.  A lovely male.  Photograph by Erick Hernandez.

Manuelia postica – One of the common Chilean s…

Manuelia postica – One of the common Chilean species of bees, this one was collected somewhere in southern Chile while on expedition last fall with Laurence Packer.  Photograph taken by Anders Croft.  

Collected by one “E.P. Reed” proba…

Collected by one “E.P. Reed” probably about 100 years ago in Central Chile this is from an orphaned collection of bees from the Smithsonian.  

While in the process of returning we are taking a few pictures of some of the more interesting bees.  This is Caupolicana fulvicollis.  At least some, if not all, of these bees are crepsucular bees…out only at dawn or at dusk where they have a secret pollen handshake with the few plants that only open their blossoms in crepusculance (possibly not a real word, but sounds like it should be to me).  Note the large ocelli on this bee….a pretty good sign that it indeed is working in low light.  Picture by Anders Croft from our lab.

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege

Paraguay! Cactus!  

Paraguay! Cactus!  

This species and its kin feed their young Cactus pollen.  One of many species which are pollen specialists in the world.  Much to discover and explore in the part of the world, particularly the Chaco region.  Specimen from the Packer lab at York University.

Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens,  Twin Macro Flash in Styrofoam Cooler,  F5.0,  ISO 100,  Shutter Speed 200, link to a .pdf of our set up is located in our profile

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege

Thalestria spinosa..the only member of its gen…

Thalestria spinosa..the only member of its genus

A nest parasite of the pollen carrying genus Oxaea.  

Note that both genera have glints of metallic integument just to make them more attractive to humans.  Sadly my lovely interns did not record where this particular specimen was collected, but I do know the specimen is likely about 100 years old and part of the Smithsonian collection.  Oh, check out the 4 lovely spines floating off the back of the thorax.  How unforunate that mammals like use never get to wear spines.  

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege