Category: pollinator

This lovely Heriades carinata is only maxima…

This lovely Heriades carinata is only maximally enjoyed when seen at full def from our flickr site. 

Print it out about 3 feet on edge and then you will really enjoy the armor this Amazon sports. 

Her glossy ebony plates have arrays of machined divots, each uniquely sized, but in relationship with the surrounding pits such that spacing and sizes array in flowering topographies of power functions that mates art and form in a perfect union. Add bands of thick ermine hairs, accenting strands of hair with a well pool of a black eye so removed from our reality that you now know that aliens commingle. Oh, this little being was found outside the sound stage of Wolf Trap Park in Virginia.

Sunflowers.  

Sunflowers.  

Specifically, the genus Helianthus to separate out the other “sunflower” plants.  

Only found in North America.  So tall and glorious that we have adopted many for our gardens.  Thrusting skyward they telegraph their supply of pollen and nectar to the bees that only feed their young pollen of Sunflower.  Here is one of them.  The appropriately named A. helainthi.  How nice that it was found tucked in Hartville, OH by MaLisa Spring.  Photo by Anders Croft.    

Number 22 in the CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD …

Number 22 in the CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD BEES.

Life of solitary bees is one of inner contemplation, most of your life will be in a completely dark cell waiting for your phenological alarm clock to go off telling you that it’s time to go out in the world. 

Once you start flying your amazingly designed wings begin to chip and fray on their edges as they hit vegetation and the ground. Ultimately they wear out and you either are eaten or you simply can no longer fly… And then are eaten.

Pow, Pow, Pow The females build the houses, ge…

Pow, Pow, Pow The females build the houses, get the groceries.  Males, just mate (and die young).

#11 in the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege

KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN.  Number seven.Pa…

KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN.  Number seven.

Pay attention, you are walking on bees when you walk on the ground.

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/
Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY
Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf
Public Bee Servant, sam droege

Andrena dunningi.  

Andrena dunningi.  

A large dark Andrena

This lovely female, in fresh plumage, is relatively easy to identify simply by the orange brown color of its body hairs along with the nearly black hairs located on its hind legs which it uses to carry pollen to its nest. However, after it’s been out in the sun for several weeks it can also turn the same off-white coloration that most of the other Andrena bees have in this group. This is a bee of tree flowers. In particular, it favors Willows, but can be found on a wide variety of spring blooming woody plants, though seemingly avoiding the heath family, which has its own specialists. This bee was photographed by Sue Boo and collected in Harford County Maryland.

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:

http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege

Paraguay! Cactus!  

Paraguay! Cactus!  

This species and its kin feed their young Cactus pollen.  One of many species which are pollen specialists in the world.  Much to discover and explore in the part of the world, particularly the Chaco region.  Specimen from the Packer lab at York University.

Canon Mark II 5D, Zerene Stacker, Stackshot Sled, 65mm Canon MP-E 1-5X macro lens,  Twin Macro Flash in Styrofoam Cooler,  F5.0,  ISO 100,  Shutter Speed 200, link to a .pdf of our set up is located in our profile

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege

celestialphotography:

celestialphotography:

Snowdrops and honeybees: first signs of Spring

Impatiens capensis

Impatiens capensis

Common or spotted Jewelweed.  

A lover of wet spots, its vegetation is viscous, wet, and used as a wash when you may have been contacted by Poison Ivy.  The flowers are total bumble bee bait …just the right size and the spur at the back end is full of nectar.  The orange color is also highly attractive to hummingbirds as a bonus.  Flowers and pictures by Helen Lowe Metzman.  

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege