Category: nature

Know Your Wild Bees Campaign presents &helli…

Know Your Wild Bees Campaign presents …how to spot a male Andrena

Sunflowers.  

Sunflowers.  

Specifically, the genus Helianthus to separate out the other “sunflower” plants.  

Only found in North America.  So tall and glorious that we have adopted many for our gardens.  Thrusting skyward they telegraph their supply of pollen and nectar to the bees that only feed their young pollen of Sunflower.  Here is one of them.  The appropriately named A. helainthi.  How nice that it was found tucked in Hartville, OH by MaLisa Spring.  Photo by Anders Croft.    

The last of the Campaign. I hope you enjoyed…

The last of the Campaign. I hope you enjoyed it. Will post the originals where you can grab them later.

#24.  In the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN

#24.  In the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN

Wild bees are effective pollinators, they don’t provide honey but they are good pollinators of most crops (not all…for example almonds would be difficult).  Management is different than with honeybees.  Nice to know that we have backups. 

Bees are small.  It doesn’t take that much pol…

Bees are small.  It doesn’t take that much pollen and nectar to raise a baby bee.  One clump of flowers is enough to support several bees.  Look around.  Are you supporting flowers….and bees.  Question lawns.

Number 23.   In the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN

Number 22 in the CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD …

Number 22 in the CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD BEES.

Life of solitary bees is one of inner contemplation, most of your life will be in a completely dark cell waiting for your phenological alarm clock to go off telling you that it’s time to go out in the world. 

Once you start flying your amazingly designed wings begin to chip and fray on their edges as they hit vegetation and the ground. Ultimately they wear out and you either are eaten or you simply can no longer fly… And then are eaten.

Honeybees, this is the bee that we all know, t…

Honeybees, this is the bee that we all know, they give us honey, they are raised commercially, and we can point at the hives; to some people it seems to be the only bee in existence. But, as you know, there’s so much more, but so little information in the air about the other 4000 species on the continent. So, it turns out, that the best way to think about wild bees is to start with the premise that everything about honeybees is different in that everything about wild bees will be something new and those patterns in natural history will be both different from honeybees, but complex and varied across the pantheon of all wild bees and their thousands of years of evolution with plants.

Number 15 in the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN.

Bees collect honeydew from bugs before spring …

Bees collect honeydew from bugs before spring blossoms arrive: undefined

Most insect studies lack crucial species infor…

Most insect studies lack crucial species information: undefined

Bees thrive when fields have borders

Bees thrive when fields have borders: undefined