Category: natural history

Darn are we  behind…this one was made i…

Darn are we  behind…this one was made in 2013 and depicts a Lasioglossum tarponense from one of the National Park Service Units we surveyed in St. John’s County in Florida.  

Its a Deep South, Deep Sand species.  Often found on the coast, but usually not right in the dunes.   Note the unusually red orange legs.  A nice feature for this species as it eliminates about 95% of all the other Lasioglossum species that are about that size and shape.  It would be nice to spend a day hanging out with these bees and getting to know what they do.  Natural history like this is so simple, but somehow it is never done, the notion of simply watching a bee all day is not nearly as attractive as watching TV all day.  Odd.

Osmia georgica.  

Osmia georgica.  

Nests in holes.  

Hangs out on mid summer composites.  

Has orange pollen carrying hairs.  

Has boss knobs on the upper side of the mandibles (why?).  

This specimen found on Dave Wagner’s  transmission line study  in New England by Michael Veit.  

All good.  

More from last year’s expedition to Chil…

More from last year’s expedition to Chile with Laurence Packer.   

Such a lovely country…we camped in a new place every day.  Ping ponging from the Andes to the Coast sleeping along the road or in open pastures.  Lovely people, easy travel, no problems with law enforcement people.   This is a Caenohalictus species of some kind.  Photo by Anders Croft  …Note the hairy eyeballs…similar to Honey bees.

Know Your Wild Bees Campaign presents &helli…

Know Your Wild Bees Campaign presents …how to spot a male Andrena

Number 16.  THE CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD BEE…

Number 16.  THE CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD BEES.

In a rough world where you can be eaten at any moment.  There is usefulness in being able to make self-supporting capsules for your babies with enough food and liquid to last a year.

Honeybees, this is the bee that we all know, t…

Honeybees, this is the bee that we all know, they give us honey, they are raised commercially, and we can point at the hives; to some people it seems to be the only bee in existence. But, as you know, there’s so much more, but so little information in the air about the other 4000 species on the continent. So, it turns out, that the best way to think about wild bees is to start with the premise that everything about honeybees is different in that everything about wild bees will be something new and those patterns in natural history will be both different from honeybees, but complex and varied across the pantheon of all wild bees and their thousands of years of evolution with plants.

Number 15 in the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN.