Category: macro

Just a tiny land snail, a couple of mm across….

Just a tiny land snail, a couple of mm across. You crush these underfoot all the time. Biscayne National Park, Florida approximately 6mm across. Photo by Kamren Jefferson

Lovely wasp from Kruger National Park.  Again,…

Lovely wasp from Kruger National Park.  Again, not being a wasp person, I don’t know the species.  The group may be the sand wasp (Bembicini) .  Photos by Anders Croft.

Fun wasp from Kruger National Park.  

Fun wasp from Kruger National Park.  

Note the expanded antennal ends (actually the other antennae snapped off).  Most likely this is one of the pollen gathering wasps in Masserinae group. 

 So, you thought only bees in the stinging category of insects gathered pollen.  Nope.  However, in North America, these wasps mostly, if not entirely show up only in the West.

One of the graciously metallic species of the …

One of the graciously metallic species of the subgenus Paracmaeodera found on flowers and bowl traps in Kruger National Park, South Africa.  Photo by Anders Croft.

Colletes solidaginis.

Colletes solidaginis.

Not a great specimen, but then again, the species is one we have seen only a few times… you get what you can take.  As the name implies there MIGHT be a relationship between this species and golden rod.  Is that true?   Someone needs to look at little more deeply and perhaps look at the pollen on the bodies of these bees to make such declarations.  

Carolina Wren – Thryothorus ludovicianus.  

Carolina Wren – Thryothorus ludovicianus.  

A common co-inhabitant with human nests.  In this case a Wren made a nest in a tub of rags we had outside under a shed roof.  We watched it for a while, but then found the tub also had a Black Rat Snake and the nest was mysteriously abandoned.  We took a picture of the left over egg….lovely in its speckles laid down in the birds oviduct.  Kelly Graninger took the shot.

Pseudopanurgus rugosus, collected by the glori…

Pseudopanurgus rugosus, collected by the glorious State of Virginia Natural Heritage group.  

This whole group is a bit of a nightmare.   

Uncommon, tiny, often very similar looking and widely ignored by taxonomists.  I often have to leave them as sp….or as we say ‘spuh’.  Which is not something that should be happening in this modern sophisticated, send-a-man-to-the-moon, sort of society.  But it is.  P. rugosus...not so difficult.  Has ‘rugged’ topography on its back…thus its name.

A lovely blue green teal spider wasp with purp…

A lovely blue green teal spider wasp with purple highlights and infuscated wings.  Collected in Southern Chile with Laurence Packer.  

Baeoalitriozus diospyri, Persimmon psyllid

Baeoalitriozus diospyri, Persimmon psyllid

Taken at 10x with a microscope objective attached to an old 200ml lens.  This is a small small small plant sucking bug.   Likely it feeds only on plants in the persimmon group.  You can see the tip of a pin glued to its back.  Equally evolved as any other insect..this small thing has secrets to tell us if we were to watch and study what it does in order to stay around for so many centuries.

Collected by Brad Seay in Davidsonville, MD

Sunflowers.  

Sunflowers.  

Specifically, the genus Helianthus to separate out the other “sunflower” plants.  

Only found in North America.  So tall and glorious that we have adopted many for our gardens.  Thrusting skyward they telegraph their supply of pollen and nectar to the bees that only feed their young pollen of Sunflower.  Here is one of them.  The appropriately named A. helainthi.  How nice that it was found tucked in Hartville, OH by MaLisa Spring.  Photo by Anders Croft.