Category: droege

If you were in the Badlands of South Dakota in…

If you were in the Badlands of South Dakota in the Summer, and were paying attention to your bumblebees, you would see this one.  

Bombus nevadensis.  

It is big and the queens are extra beefy.  This is one of the dark bumbles.  More black on the sides of the body and tinted wings.   Bug-wise, it doesn’t really get a lot heaftier than this in the North American world.  There are some big beetles but they don’t gaily fly around gathering pollen…pretty amazing you big ol’ bumbly bee (wow, did I just say that? I will have to watch it or my pontificatory science license will get revoked).Photo by Kelly Graninger.

Bee biologists all struggle with identifying…

Bee biologists all struggle with identifying what they catch. Its irritating that, even under a microscope, it is difficult to tell many species apart. Here is an example…but it does have a “tell." 

Megachile pseudobrevis has extensive black hairs at the tip of the underside of the abdomen while M. brevis has almost entirely white hairs. There you go. This specimen from Georgia. This shot by Kamren Jefferson.

A lovely reddish haired carpenter bee from Kru…

A lovely reddish haired carpenter bee from Kruger National Park.  Picture by Erick Hernandez.

Aptly named:  Lasioglossum coeruleum.  

Aptly named:  Lasioglossum coeruleum.  

Most of the many confusing members of these small sweat bees glimmer discretely in metallic integument, but our friend here takes it up a notch to and Osmia level.  

This makes them identifiable…except for the problem that some of them are not so bright…irritating if you have to identify them…but once you get the pattern you feel a small sense of superiority to those in power in the world who clearly would fail if you asked them to identify an “off” L. coeruleum specimen. So there.  Specimen collected by Michael Veit in transmission lines in CT…

Wayyyyyy up in the Andes spitting distance fro…

Wayyyyyy up in the Andes spitting distance from Argentina, this wee Callonychium chilense was collected on an expedition with Laurence Packer to southern Chile.  One of those one way dirt roads that hugs the mountains and gives one opportunity to fall into the valley in a truly spectacular way. Memorable.

Know Your Wild Bees Campaign presents &helli…

Know Your Wild Bees Campaign presents …how to spot a male Andrena

Baeoalitriozus diospyri, Persimmon psyllid

Baeoalitriozus diospyri, Persimmon psyllid

Taken at 10x with a microscope objective attached to an old 200ml lens.  This is a small small small plant sucking bug.   Likely it feeds only on plants in the persimmon group.  You can see the tip of a pin glued to its back.  Equally evolved as any other insect..this small thing has secrets to tell us if we were to watch and study what it does in order to stay around for so many centuries.

Collected by Brad Seay in Davidsonville, MD

Number 16.  THE CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD BEE…

Number 16.  THE CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD BEES.

In a rough world where you can be eaten at any moment.  There is usefulness in being able to make self-supporting capsules for your babies with enough food and liquid to last a year.

Parasites.  Why not let others do your work?

Parasites.  Why not let others do your work?

#9 – KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege

#5 The Sting of the Bee. More like a hypodermi…

  • #5 The Sting of the Bee. More like a hypodermic needle…less like a fish hook. The KNOW YOUR WILD BEES campaign helps you at cocktail parties