Category: bugs

Here is a short 3 picture series of 3 Mylabris…

Here is a short 3 picture series of 3 Mylabris blister beetles from Kruger National Park, where they are often found on tree flowers.  

I had the unfortunate experience of storing a bunch of these in my pocket while in the bush.  Later that night my upper thigh was covered in large blisters.  Be warned.  Cool antennae, why so divided, some of you need to figure this out.  

Pictures by Erick Hernandez and Anders Croft.

One of the graciously metallic species of the …

One of the graciously metallic species of the subgenus Paracmaeodera found on flowers and bowl traps in Kruger National Park, South Africa.  Photo by Anders Croft.

Colletes solidaginis.

Colletes solidaginis.

Not a great specimen, but then again, the species is one we have seen only a few times… you get what you can take.  As the name implies there MIGHT be a relationship between this species and golden rod.  Is that true?   Someone needs to look at little more deeply and perhaps look at the pollen on the bodies of these bees to make such declarations.  

This lovely Heriades carinata is only maxima…

This lovely Heriades carinata is only maximally enjoyed when seen at full def from our flickr site. 

Print it out about 3 feet on edge and then you will really enjoy the armor this Amazon sports. 

Her glossy ebony plates have arrays of machined divots, each uniquely sized, but in relationship with the surrounding pits such that spacing and sizes array in flowering topographies of power functions that mates art and form in a perfect union. Add bands of thick ermine hairs, accenting strands of hair with a well pool of a black eye so removed from our reality that you now know that aliens commingle. Oh, this little being was found outside the sound stage of Wolf Trap Park in Virginia.

The next in the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN…

The next in the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN.  

Calliopsis are often specialists…the most common (C. andreniformis) loves things like hard packed playgrounds.  You have it at your house almost for sure.  Want more of them dig a whole or pile up dirt and they will move in for you to watch…along with their wee Holcopasites parasite. 

Oak Timberworm, Arrhenodes minutus, and an int…

Oak Timberworm, Arrhenodes minutus, and an interesting mite on its mid femur, found at my moth light…likely attracted to the area due to the fresh red oak I am adding to the wood pile.  Note the odd mite appears to be glued to the femur, it was still alive when the picture was taken, but apparently could not leave its host.

The luscious greenescent caterpillar of the br…

The luscious greenescent caterpillar of the brown drab northern pearly eye butterfly.  check out the 6 little eyes located down near the mouth/mandibles, I feel rather “Hello Kitty” when looking this one in the face

Number 14 in the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN.

Number 14 in the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN.

Plant biodiversity is the answer to the bigger question of how do we keep all our bee species around. Planting flowers is always a good thing, this definitely increases the overall number of bees in any location. However, what it does is increase the overall number of generalist bees, that are happy to make do with many kinds of flowers, and often do well simply on weeds. The truth is that to affect conservation of all bee species we have to retain wild areas, maintain natural areas, and be the caretakers of rich, bio diverse, plant communities that provide the necessary pollen for all the species, particularly the ones that are highly specialized and therefore using plants we are unlikely to plant in our gardens or in pollinator meadows. Look around you, what can you do to help keep plant communities healthy; pull invasive species, provide disturbance in those environments that are early successional, control deer populations, and support others who do these things professionally. Good luck pilgrim.

#4.   Why Females are Twice Males.

#4.   Why Females are Twice Males.

The KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege

I like looking at this shot, the symmetry, th…

I like looking at this shot, the symmetry, this alien being, this unknowable insect, there is something alive, even relatable here. 

This one is worth looking at full-screen. 

What if, indeed, this Megachile brevis, was as large as a puppy dog, would we treat it the same as we do now? 

A bug can be ignored, because it doesn’t sting us and because it isn’t the size that our eyes can view all the particulars, all the wonderful details that are built into this being in a similar but different way than the flowers that pollinate’s and we honor by making him into bouquets and making them integral to all our major life events. 

Would they make good pets? Would they like to be groomed by us, scratched behind the head? My my I probably shouldn’t write these things late at night they’re just too many rabbit holes out there to fall into.

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:

http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege