Category: bugs

Oak Timberworm, Arrhenodes minutus, and an int…

Oak Timberworm, Arrhenodes minutus, and an interesting mite on its mid femur, found at my moth light…likely attracted to the area due to the fresh red oak I am adding to the wood pile.  Note the odd mite appears to be glued to the femur, it was still alive when the picture was taken, but apparently could not leave its host.

The luscious greenescent caterpillar of the br…

The luscious greenescent caterpillar of the brown drab northern pearly eye butterfly.  check out the 6 little eyes located down near the mouth/mandibles, I feel rather “Hello Kitty” when looking this one in the face

Number 14 in the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN.

Number 14 in the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN.

Plant biodiversity is the answer to the bigger question of how do we keep all our bee species around. Planting flowers is always a good thing, this definitely increases the overall number of bees in any location. However, what it does is increase the overall number of generalist bees, that are happy to make do with many kinds of flowers, and often do well simply on weeds. The truth is that to affect conservation of all bee species we have to retain wild areas, maintain natural areas, and be the caretakers of rich, bio diverse, plant communities that provide the necessary pollen for all the species, particularly the ones that are highly specialized and therefore using plants we are unlikely to plant in our gardens or in pollinator meadows. Look around you, what can you do to help keep plant communities healthy; pull invasive species, provide disturbance in those environments that are early successional, control deer populations, and support others who do these things professionally. Good luck pilgrim.

#4.   Why Females are Twice Males.

#4.   Why Females are Twice Males.

The KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege

I like looking at this shot, the symmetry, th…

I like looking at this shot, the symmetry, this alien being, this unknowable insect, there is something alive, even relatable here. 

This one is worth looking at full-screen. 

What if, indeed, this Megachile brevis, was as large as a puppy dog, would we treat it the same as we do now? 

A bug can be ignored, because it doesn’t sting us and because it isn’t the size that our eyes can view all the particulars, all the wonderful details that are built into this being in a similar but different way than the flowers that pollinate’s and we honor by making him into bouquets and making them integral to all our major life events. 

Would they make good pets? Would they like to be groomed by us, scratched behind the head? My my I probably shouldn’t write these things late at night they’re just too many rabbit holes out there to fall into.

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:

http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege

Andrena dunningi.  

Andrena dunningi.  

A large dark Andrena

This lovely female, in fresh plumage, is relatively easy to identify simply by the orange brown color of its body hairs along with the nearly black hairs located on its hind legs which it uses to carry pollen to its nest. However, after it’s been out in the sun for several weeks it can also turn the same off-white coloration that most of the other Andrena bees have in this group. This is a bee of tree flowers. In particular, it favors Willows, but can be found on a wide variety of spring blooming woody plants, though seemingly avoiding the heath family, which has its own specialists. This bee was photographed by Sue Boo and collected in Harford County Maryland.

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:

http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege

The most common Coelioxys in the East.  

The most common Coelioxys in the East.  

This is C. sayi.   

Now, C. sayi is a nest parasite (like all Coelioxys) and it likes to drop its eggs in the nest of what is usually the most common Leaf Cutter in the East Megachile mendica.  That said, these bees are so little studied that it would not be at all surprising to find that are also  dropping eggs in similar hosts such as M. brevis

These bees are well armored against the stings of the hunky leaf cutters, to the extent that putting a pin through them when preparing them can be a bit crunchy (Another cocktail fact from your favorite government program).  Pictures by Dejen Mengis whose experiences in the Bee Lab caused him to join the Peace Corp.  

How great would these look turned into decorat…

How great would these look turned into decorations and hung from the Christmas tree?! 🎄🐞🦋🐝🎄

In my garden, birds sing, bees hum and the flo…

In my garden, birds sing, bees hum and the flowers and butterflies bewitch me. Every bug and beetle, petal and leaf grants peace to me in the present moment. As I tread upon the emerald blades that sway below the crystal skies, my garden unveils to me the philosophy of life.

Isn’t this a boss looking bee?  

Isn’t this a boss looking bee?  

This is Dianthidium singulare.  

One of the largest Dianthidiums around.   Check out the winged plates near the collar of the bee and the shield like tegula that covers the front wing’s insertion point into the body.  Such a dramatic species.  This girl takes resin and pebbles and glues together little cells that it attaches to rock faces….these armored houses then are filled with pollen and nectar and a single egg before sealing up.  Captured as part of Claire Kremen’s project documenting the bees of Yosemite National Park.

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege