Category: black background

Kruger National Park presents a native South A…

Kruger National Park presents a native South African:  Xylocopa lugubris.  

This carpenter bee was caught cruising around the park while along on Jonathan Mawdsley and James Harrison’s expedition.  Lots of fun avoiding poisonous snakes, lions, and leopards and other big things.  Photo by Erick Hernandez.

The red maple, Acer rubrum

The red maple, Acer rubrum

Often one of the most dominant trees in deciduous woods in the East. It blooms very early in the spring and provides pollen and nectar to the set of bees, and flower flies, that come out early. One can only imagine what the tonnage of pollen and nectar these trees produce in aggregate, and how such a seemingly small, component of the tree, flowers, could drive the populations of a huge number of bees and other insects in. Flowers collected by the photographs taken by Helen Lowe Metzman from Howard County Maryland.

Another dark northern Andrena. This one (And…

Another dark northern Andrena

This one (Andrena milwaukiensis) also runs down the high elevations of the Rockies and the Appalachians. Collected in Hancock County, Maine and contibuted by Alison Dibble. Photographed by Wayne Boo

Lithurgopsis gibbosa – In North America the …

Lithurgopsis gibbosa – In North America the members of this genus are primarily cactus pollen specialists. Since this one was captured in the sandhills of North Carolina by Heather Moylett it is undoubtedly covered in Prickly Pear cactus pollen. Note the projecting shelf just below the antennae on this female.

A new Washington DC record. 

A new Washington DC record. 

Triepeolus cressonii, captured in the Kenilworth aquatic Gardens along the Anacostia River.  

A very urban landscape, but one that still retains quite a bit of original nature thanks to the work of the National Park Service maintains the property as well as adjacent areas along this quiet backwater. The specimen was collected by and photographed by Chelcey Nordstrom.

Check out our Flickr site for more details and at that location you can download the originals. Everything is public domain.

#20 in the CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD BEESWh…

#20 in the CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD BEES

While there is a lot of talk of bee decline,..

We know so very little about the actual status of bees that we may have species that need to be listed, but you can’t list something unless you know something about its status. I like to encourage people to submit photos of bees to BugGuide as well as to i-naturalist particularly if they start targeting uncommon plants and their visitors. Traditional collecting of bees for museums is even better. For example, yesterday, within a mile of the laboratory I was poking around and came across a large patch of deerberry and sure enough the very uncommonly recorded specialist (and most people very rare) species Panurginus atramontenis were all over the bloom. I easily could’ve caught over hundred. Just one example where poking around in the right place can yield big results. Bombus affinis is our one endangered species, a bumblebee, and therefore something that people have paid attention to over the years. As part of a larger syndrome of decline due to pathogens brought over from Europe the species is particularly hard-hit and largely restricted to the upper Midwest and Appalachia. Again, take pictures, submit them to Bumblebee Watch and to the other two places I mentioned and maybe we can find some additional specimens.

Number 16.  THE CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD BEE…

Number 16.  THE CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD BEES.

In a rough world where you can be eaten at any moment.  There is usefulness in being able to make self-supporting capsules for your babies with enough food and liquid to last a year.

#13 in the CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD BEES,All…

#13 in the CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD BEES,

All bees are picky to some extent about what pollen they gather and feed their young. You have favorite foods, they have favorite foods, if their favorite food is absent… They are absent.

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege

#10 in the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN

#10 in the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN

The problem with alien bees.

1% is low, but some recent pilgrims to the U.S. are now building up populations to levels where they dominate some capture events.

Do we have a problem? Right now, maybe not so much, but in the future…the answer is probably we will.  Just look at the ladybug situation.  Almost all the ladybugs you see are…not from this continent.

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege

Would the public changes its attitude towards …

Would the public changes its attitude towards bees if they realized that they were really just wasps?

Number eight in the Know Your Wild Bees Campaign

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege