Category: biml

Kruger National Park presents a native South A…

Kruger National Park presents a native South African:  Xylocopa lugubris.  

This carpenter bee was caught cruising around the park while along on Jonathan Mawdsley and James Harrison’s expedition.  Lots of fun avoiding poisonous snakes, lions, and leopards and other big things.  Photo by Erick Hernandez.

Ah, the dancing curves of Corydalis flavula.  

Ah, the dancing curves of Corydalis flavula.  

A small part of the glory of spring in the Mid-Atlantic states.  

Picture and specimen from Helen Lowe Metzman from Howard County, Maryland.

A yellow faced Calliopsis trifasciata from sou…

A yellow faced Calliopsis trifasciata from southern Chile.  Garnered on an expedition with Laurence Packer this past year.  

Know Your Wild Bees Campaign presents &helli…

Know Your Wild Bees Campaign presents …how to spot a male Andrena

Start of a new series in the KNOW YOUR WILD …

Start of a new series in the KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN. 

Now we move into the magic of field ID. 

Go outside, use butterfly binoculars … you can do it. Eastern North American Genera are our target, but in most cases the same characters will work anywhere. I am serious about this…the only reason we have bird conservation is because of bird watchers…so you need to become a bee watcher…and you will save the world.

Tiger Beetle from one of the old sand mines th…

Tiger Beetle from one of the old sand mines that line the Patuxent River.  Thankfully it is a sand mine that never was capped with clay and planted with invasive non-native plants…the standard operation in many parts of the country.  Lisa Murray took the photographs.  

An unknown Crab Spider or perhaps running crab…

An unknown Crab Spider or perhaps running crab spider

The red maple, Acer rubrum

The red maple, Acer rubrum

Often one of the most dominant trees in deciduous woods in the East. It blooms very early in the spring and provides pollen and nectar to the set of bees, and flower flies, that come out early. One can only imagine what the tonnage of pollen and nectar these trees produce in aggregate, and how such a seemingly small, component of the tree, flowers, could drive the populations of a huge number of bees and other insects in. Flowers collected by the photographs taken by Helen Lowe Metzman from Howard County Maryland.

The last of the Campaign. I hope you enjoyed…

The last of the Campaign. I hope you enjoyed it. Will post the originals where you can grab them later.

Number 16.  THE CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD BEE…

Number 16.  THE CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD BEES.

In a rough world where you can be eaten at any moment.  There is usefulness in being able to make self-supporting capsules for your babies with enough food and liquid to last a year.