Category: biml

An unknown Crab Spider or perhaps running crab…

An unknown Crab Spider or perhaps running crab spider

The red maple, Acer rubrum

The red maple, Acer rubrum

Often one of the most dominant trees in deciduous woods in the East. It blooms very early in the spring and provides pollen and nectar to the set of bees, and flower flies, that come out early. One can only imagine what the tonnage of pollen and nectar these trees produce in aggregate, and how such a seemingly small, component of the tree, flowers, could drive the populations of a huge number of bees and other insects in. Flowers collected by the photographs taken by Helen Lowe Metzman from Howard County Maryland.

The last of the Campaign. I hope you enjoyed…

The last of the Campaign. I hope you enjoyed it. Will post the originals where you can grab them later.

Number 16.  THE CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD BEE…

Number 16.  THE CAMPAIGN TO KNOW YOUR WILD BEES.

In a rough world where you can be eaten at any moment.  There is usefulness in being able to make self-supporting capsules for your babies with enough food and liquid to last a year.

Parasites.  Why not let others do your work?

Parasites.  Why not let others do your work?

#9 – KNOW YOUR WILD BEES CAMPAIGN

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege

#5 The Sting of the Bee. More like a hypodermi…

  • #5 The Sting of the Bee. More like a hypodermic needle…less like a fish hook. The KNOW YOUR WILD BEES campaign helps you at cocktail parties

Day 3

Day 3

Dawn glints off the massive egg of a carpenter bee

The Know Your Wild Bees Baby Campaign

The most common Coelioxys in the East.  

The most common Coelioxys in the East.  

This is C. sayi.   

Now, C. sayi is a nest parasite (like all Coelioxys) and it likes to drop its eggs in the nest of what is usually the most common Leaf Cutter in the East Megachile mendica.  That said, these bees are so little studied that it would not be at all surprising to find that are also  dropping eggs in similar hosts such as M. brevis

These bees are well armored against the stings of the hunky leaf cutters, to the extent that putting a pin through them when preparing them can be a bit crunchy (Another cocktail fact from your favorite government program).  Pictures by Dejen Mengis whose experiences in the Bee Lab caused him to join the Peace Corp.  

A head of a specimen of Bombus affinis from th…

A head of a specimen of Bombus affinis from the tip of Long Island, collected by the fabulous Roy Lantham a Potato Farmer, naturalist, and insect collector.  From what I know, Roy (now passed on) was quite the eccentric, but he made very valuable contributions to all sorts of natural history fields from his collections of local plants and animals.  

[Aside:  A little sidebar here: Why not do a little self check-in here to assess whether you have made any sort of permanent contribution to the natural history world]. 

Roy’s permanent contributions form reference points from now until we depopulate ourselves and the insects once again take over.  Photograph by Greta Forbes.  

All original pictures completely public domain and available at our Flickr site: https://www.flickr.com/photos/usgsbiml/

Photography Information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-_yvIsucOY

Follow us on Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/usgsbiml/

Download our free field guide to the genera of bees:http://bio2.elmira.edu/fieldbio/beesofmarylandbookversion1.pdf

Public Bee Servant, sam droege

Here is a lovely black and red seed. 

Here is a lovely black and red seed. 

 Photographed on the cut tip of a pin. 

Sadly, I do not have a record of the seed’s name, so any help with this distinct specimen would be appreciated.  This seed came from a 100 year old collection of seeds used as reference by the old Bureau of Biological Survey.  They would dissect vertebrate stomachs and then determine what they ate by identifying the seeds there in…thus the need for the seed collection.  Am going through the unprocessed specimens while we get our new set up running.  This dates to 2014.