Category: bees

opinion on bees

opinion on bees

Bees are good beans. The bumble about and pollinate and don’t bother anyone. 

Wasps, on the other hand…

A male Lasioglossum truncatum, with great, lon…

A male Lasioglossum truncatum, with great, long antennae, the yellow tarsal segments are distinctive in conjunction with the yellow on the clypeus and the slightly weakened veins in the wings.  Collected by Tim McMahon and photoed by Dejen Mengis.  Here I see the hands of a Balinese dancer

The giant bumblebee (Bombus dahlbomii). 

The giant bumblebee (Bombus dahlbomii). 

A denizen of the southern Andes and widely believed to be in decline due to competition and perhaps spread of pathogens with two introduced European bumblebees that have invaded the region. You notice this bee when it flies by. Dramatically orange with yellow highlights on the traditional deep black integument of bumblebees.

Another lovely shot of the common but still lo…

Another lovely shot of the common but still lovely Andrena cressonii.  Thanks to Erick Hernandez for the photography

Have you seem the bees???

Have you seem the bees???

Regular

ATTENTION ALL BEE LOVERS

Look at this mug 🙂

Lithurgopsis gibbosa – In North America the …

Lithurgopsis gibbosa – In North America the members of this genus are primarily cactus pollen specialists. Since this one was captured in the sandhills of North Carolina by Heather Moylett it is undoubtedly covered in Prickly Pear cactus pollen. Note the projecting shelf just below the antennae on this female.

Andrena cressonii.

Andrena cressonii.

Common, nearly ubiquitous.  Tolerates urban areas.  Just like us.

A new Washington DC record. 

A new Washington DC record. 

Triepeolus cressonii, captured in the Kenilworth aquatic Gardens along the Anacostia River.  

A very urban landscape, but one that still retains quite a bit of original nature thanks to the work of the National Park Service maintains the property as well as adjacent areas along this quiet backwater. The specimen was collected by and photographed by Chelcey Nordstrom.

Check out our Flickr site for more details and at that location you can download the originals. Everything is public domain.

Sunflowers.  

Sunflowers.  

Specifically, the genus Helianthus to separate out the other “sunflower” plants.  

Only found in North America.  So tall and glorious that we have adopted many for our gardens.  Thrusting skyward they telegraph their supply of pollen and nectar to the bees that only feed their young pollen of Sunflower.  Here is one of them.  The appropriately named A. helainthi.  How nice that it was found tucked in Hartville, OH by MaLisa Spring.  Photo by Anders Croft.